Erin is a student at Minnesota State University, and originally from Cedar Rapids, IA. She is a fan of toy cameras. We knew that before contacting her because all of her BeFunky photos posted to our Flickr group were altered with either HolgaArt, LomoArt or similar effects. She even has a real Holga camera which you can see here.

BeFunky: What kind of photos do you take?
Erin: It’s all over the place, really. I’d say my favorite things to photograph are old buildings, graffiti, big fields, brightly colored plastic objects, my dog and cat, strange things at the grocery store, and random things around the house. I try to bring with my cameras with me everywhere I go in case I happen to find something I’d like to take a picture of.

It seems that you like toy camera effects like Holga and Lomo. What makes them special for you?
I’m obsessed with toy cameras. I currently only have one, a Holga Micro-110, but I hope to get some more in the future. I love the look of photos taken with toy cameras so until I’m able to get my hands on the real thing, being able to use these effects on my digital photos is great.

Can you give any tips about using these effects? What kind of photos, effect settings, etc…
A lot of the pictures I edit on BeFunky were pictures I wasn’t satisfied with on their own. They might have been too blurry or just kind of boring. Before deleting photos I usually try a few different effects on them to see if I like them better. I would recommend this to anyone who takes a lot of pictures and ends up deleting most of them.

Also some effects don’t work as well on certain types of photos. For example, I’ve found that the Inkify effects look better on pictures of buildings, power lines, stuff like that.

What do you like best about BeFunky?
I like that it’s easy to use and that there’s a wide variety of different effects.

Anything you don’t like and wish would change?
There really isn’t anything that I don’t like! But adding more effects is always a good thing. I love the Lomo, Holga, and pinhole effects so more of those might be cool.

If you’d like to learn more about Erin, or see more of her work, visit her blog at